Blogoscopy

On Andrew Sullivan’s site, an echt-bloggische exchange. Sullivan and his readers have been making fun of sexually suggestive names (inspired by A. Weiner). One of his readers writes to complain:

As someone with an unusual last name in which teenagers and adolescents can find a sexual reference if they try hard enough, I can assure you that all those “Dicks” and “Weiners” out there have heard the same jokes over and over. How about moving along?

Sullivan responds:

You think I have my own blog so I can “move along” when talking about funny names?

Have I said lately how grateful I am to …

… my readers, who regularly send me items of interest on which they think this blog should comment? University Diaries couldn’t do its thing without all of you linking UD to university stuff.

Just in the last couple of days, readers sent me this facility-porn from the University of Oregon; an instance of jesuitical reasoning in the Georgetown University newspaper; strong commentary and – in the comments on the commentary – strong debate on the just-released MIT report in the Aaron Swartz case; and details on growing civil resistance against threats to privacy at Penn State.

As the new academic year begins, UD will – with your help – continue covering and commenting on university stories like these.

Our Bog is Dood…

… as Stevie Smith might have said. Our bog, University Diaries, has been dood, and is still somewhat moribund (takes rather a long time to open, for instance). The reasons are complex (we weren’t hacked; the problem has to do with success, as in this blog generates too much traffic for the old server it’s on) but they are (slowly) on their way to being resolved, and I have as always to thank my webmistress, Carolyn, and my readers, several of whom wrote to tell me that things weren’t working. I apologize for the difficulties UD readers have been having with the site; things should be much better very soon. Feel free to write to me or Carolyn (see bottom of this page) with any updates.

Meanwhile, I’ll try to post a bunch of new stuff I’ve been accumulating. We’ll see how things go.

“University Sports in the Age of the DSM”…

… on the subject of the Rutgers University basketball scandal – is now up at Inside Higher Education.

UD’s take on the Princeton University …

gather ye assortative rosebuds while ye may controversy is here, at Inside Higher Education.

‘Insider MOOCs,’ UD’s latest Inside Higher Ed column…

…is now up.

UD’s latest Inside Higher Ed post…

… on what she calls Insider MOOCs, will be available for viewing this evening. I’ll link to it when it’s up.

“The Cults of Chico”…

… my latest Inside Higher Education column, will appear early Monday morning. I’ll link to it here.

UD’s latest post at her other blog at Inside Higher Education…

… features horrendous University of Hawaii.

A scan of my referral log…

… reveals that for whatever reason a number of people are searching for this 2008 post of UD‘s, titled Better Living Through Consciousness: Why You Should Take Your College Education Seriously. There’s the link to it, in case you’re having any difficulty finding it. It appeared at UD‘s other blog, at Inside Higher Education.

UD is back home in Garrett Park…

… contemplating with pleasure the number of people at the Harvard Allan Bloom event who know her as UD. Who, that is to say, are readers of her blog. This list includes Alan Wolfe and William Kristol. UD is delighted.

From a post calling for the end of law reviews.

[W]hen it comes to discussion of timely controversies, slash-and-thrust debates, and other forms of writing that people actually go out of their way to read, there’s no doubt where talented legal academics are headed: to blogs and other shorter-form online publications.

Much of the intellectual groundwork for the Supreme Court’s ObamaCare rulings was laid at blogs like Volokh Conspiracy (for libertarians and conservatives trying to overturn the individual mandate) and Jack Balkin’s Balkinization (for liberals defending it). Elizabeth Warren became a national figure in part through her clear and hard-hitting online writing about the problems of consumer debt. Professionally edited web outlets (including The Atlantic) allow law professors to get their arguments before an intelligent audience in hours rather than weeks or months. As online law writing has taken off, readers are rewarding qualities like clarity, concision, relevance, and wit, and steering clear of pedantry and mystification.

My fifth Faculty Project lecture on poetry…

… will shortly be available. It’s a close reading of Sunday Morning, by Wallace Stevens.

My fifth in a series of posts at Inside Higher Education about doing a MOOC will also be published soon. I’ll link to it.

Lots of linking to University Diaries lately…

… and UD has been meaning to extend formal welcomes to people boarding her blog from elsewhere. So – UD welcomes readers from

The Atlantic

Chronicle of Higher Ed

Marginal Revolution

I’m glad you’re here. Take a look around.

Back when she started blogging…

UD loved to read a blogger calling himself Fenster Moop. Fenster was witty, wise, and very well-informed about academia.

Fenster left the web for awhile, but he’s back with this new blog.

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